Browse Exhibits (20 total)

Oppenheimer Family

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On the morning of December 8, 1941, the Nazi SS forced Erika Mannheimer and her family from their home in Bad Wildungen, Germany and sent them to Riga Ghetto in Latvia. After a 3 day journey by train, without food and water, they reached the ghetto where they found "empty houses, burnt out synagogues, over crowded cemeteries, and bodies lying in the streets, swimming in their own blood." Erika was 18 years old.

In 1946, Erika documented her experiences traveling from ghetto to work camp to concentration camp, 11 locations in all, from December 1941 to January 1945. She lost 11 members of her family, from 3 generations, at the hands of Nazi perpetrators, but survived to tell her story. Her son, Richard Oppenheimer, graciously shared her diary, family photos, and documents with the University of South Florida Library to honor Erika's life and memory in this online exhibit.

Swing Along: The Music of Early African American Composers

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This exhibit was created to showcase a selection of music that was digitized from the USF Libraries African American Sheet Music Collection to celebrate African American History Month in 2019, and to illuminate the authors behind the music. 

USF Armenian Studies

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Armenian Studies at the USF Libraries 

The Armenian Studies Initiative builds research collections in English, Armenian, and other languages; offers programming in Armenian history and culture; positions Armenia squarely in the historical and policy debates about genocide and its prevention; engages with the Armenian community, especially in the southeastern U.S.; and enhances intercultural dialogue about the shared experiences of the survivors of oppression and attempted annihilation.

Alicia Appleman-Jurman: Her Story and Beyond

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Alicia Appleman-Jurman was only 11 years old when the Nazis invaded & occupied her homeland of Poland.  Alicia survived World War II & the Jewish Holocaust.  Alicia: My Story is the inspiring account of her survival and recounts through the eyes of one the brutality perpetrated on millions.

Importantly, Alicia's story portrays those targeted by genocide not as victims, but as agents in their own survival.  Following her life between ages 9 and 18, the memoir empowers young persons, and young women in particular. In showing Alicia's resilience, courage, and humanity in the face of extraordinarily horrific events, this exhibit seeks to inspire the ideal of tikkun olam - making the world a better place.

The Jewish Federation of Sarasota-Manatee is a proud sponsor of Alicia Appleman-Jurman: Her Story & Beyond - An Interactive, Student-Focused Website forHolocaust Education.

Once Upon a Homecoming

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Once upon a time in what would become Bulls Country, there grew a university with no traditions, no dormitories, no mascot, no athletics, and a small-campus identity.  Here at the University of South Florida, traditions slowly developed as its programs and amenities grew, culminating in an annual Homecoming celebration. Homecoming festivities are an opportunity for USF students and alumni to show their school spirit.  Although homecoming has developed gradually with the growth of USF, today it is a major attraction that features a week of campus events, athletic games, parties, carnivals, a parade, and much more.  Please join the Tampa Library’s Special Collections for this photo exhibit documenting the history of homecoming at USF, named after the theme for the festivities of 2014, “Once Upon a Homecoming.”  

Curated by Andrew Huse.

The "Witch Hunt" at USF: Experiencing the Johns Committee Through Primary Resources

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This exhibit will introduce viewers to the Florida Legislative Investigation Committee (or Johns Committee) through primary sources held by USF Tampa's Special Collections and made available online through the library's digitization unit.  The Florida Legislative Investigation Committee digital collections consists of materials from the John Egerton Papers, John Allen Papers, and the University of South Florida Archives curated for exhibition by archivist Andrew Huse.  Materials for this exhibit draw from these collections as well as those of Sumter Lowry, Terrell Sessums and Governor LeRoy Collins.  

Besides providing an overview of FLIC at USF, this exhibit will link to various materials that can be found in the collections named above.

We tend to think of the events surrounding FLIC as being of another place and time, quietly and comfortably in our past. But a careful study of race, politics, sexuality, fear, and hate reveals that while the Johns Committee has been defunct for 50 years, the social forces that created it are still prominent in the United States. 

Navigate the exhibit by clicking on the chapter titles to the right.

Florida Digital Postcards Exhibit

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Florida Digital Postcard Exhibit

The Florida Digital Postcard exhibit, created in fall 2015, is a curated presentation of the digitized images from The Hampton Dunn Florida Postcard collection housed in the University of South Florida Libraries Special Collections.  An output of the first stage in the full-scale digitization of the collection, this exhibit features over three hundred postcards on Hillsborough County.  Drawn mostly from the first half of the twentieth century (and many from the Golden Age of Postcards), the images bring to view the streets, waterways, industry and society from the founding of modern Tampa.  The exhibit provides a visual history of significant events and everyday life, of buildings and travel, of nostalgia and progress that characterized Florida.  Inscribed with brief narratives of correspondents, the cards record the voices of travelers, businessmen, separated friends and family who passed through this place in history. Filled with alligators and airplanes, palm trees and bridges, the postcards raise questions about how people approached this exotic and fruitful land in the days before air conditioning. The cards invite us to join them in the past and re-envision the place we inhabit now.

The Tampa Bay Estuary: An Oral History of Community Collaboration to Restore Ecological Integrity

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Welcome to the Tampa Bay Estuary Oral History Project with an introductory video by our sponsor TECO Energy.

Enter and navigate the exhibit by clicking on the chapter titles to the left.

Jazz in Florida

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     The Jazz in Florida Archive is ongoing project, begun in spring 2016, to document and preserve Florida’s place in jazz history. The project features student research and writing under the direction of Prof. Andrew Berish.

     The archive will contain oral histories, photographs, manuscripts, sheet music, letters and other materials related to jazz in the state. We hope these materials connect jazz fans, musicians, educators, students, scholars, and industry professionals to a living, interactive digital database that bridges the gap of personal (oral histories and stories), local (Florida, and more specifically the Tampa Bay Area), and national jazz history.

     In focusing on the local, the archive hopes to serve as a model and inspiration to other archival and research projects attempting to document jazz’s diverse local languages.

 

"We Wanted Some Basic Human Rights": The Civil Rights Struggle in Tampa

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This web exhibition examines the history of the Civil Rights Movement in Tampa and its environs. It utilizes documents located in the Special Collections Division of the USF Tampa library. This exhibition was produced during a Spring 2016 seminar on the Civil Rights Movement, taught by Dr. K. Stephen Prince of the USF history department. Students consulted more than fifteen archival collections housed in the USF Tampa Library Special Collections, selecting a representative sample of documents to reproduce here. Short analytical headnotes will guide readers through the narrative. Links to the documents are also provided.

     The title of this web exhibition is drawn from a 1978 interview with Betty Wiggins, an African American civil rights activist and community leader in Tampa.